Postural Care– “It’s all about Family” Conference 2017

Postural Care– “It’s all about Family Conference” May 10, 2017 – May 11, 2017 at the Hilton Hotel in Bristol.

Here is the letter about our new, upcoming conference in May 2017:

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I work for a non profit organisation called Elijah's Hope. Elijah is a 9 year old boy with Apert Syndrome.

Elijah’s Hope supports and campaigns for severely disabled children and their families in every single part of their lives.

We are holding our THIRD conference on the 10th and 11th of May 2017.

Once again, it is being held at the Hilton Hotel in Bristol

Hilton hotel Bristol BS

 

We are in the process of putting together a Brochure and Booking Form so if you are interested and would like to come along then please let me know and we can get the information out to you.

This is just a snap shot below of the feedback from our last conference that was held in November 2015.

“The whole thing has been AMAZING.   I am a tad overwhelmed but will process what I’ve learned”.

“Interesting and insightful talks.  Good networking opportunities.  Very informative – knowledge & info to take back to my team”.

“Met a great variety of people – lots of different people from a variety of backgrounds, knowledge & experience who have challenged & progressed previous ways of thinking with motivation and ideas to review current practice and how this can be improved”.

“Just raising awareness that postural care really works and having the evidence to prove it”

The event is a completely family centred approach and is dedicated to improving postural care. It will bring together both specialist and families from the UK and around the world to share knowledge and best practice.

What is postural care?

Postural Care is a gentle way of protecting a person’s body shape.  Any person who finds it difficult to move or to change position effectively may benefit from Postural Care.  Changes in body shape happen silently, mostly when we are asleep in our beds, at a time we would imagine we and those we love were safe from harm.  The danger comes from gravity and so no matter what age the person is we must never lower our guard.  Ultimately body shape distortion is a killer, it is an enemy we must treat with the reverence and respect it deserves.

Postural Care prolongs life

In March 2013 there was inquiry into Premature Deaths of people with learning disabilities; the team recommended that adults with learning disabilities are to be considered a high-risk group for deaths from respiratory problems.

Just take a moment to imagine this goal, think about a world in which hip dislocation in young children is seen as the glaring exception and not an accepted norm, a world in which young people rarely undergo radical spinal surgery because they just don’t need to, a world in which people can get on and live their lives with minimal chronic pain and discomfort.  The view would be amazing wouldn’t it?

Postural Care is about making sure that people who are at risk of developing changes in their body shape are supported as symmetrically as possible, as comfortably as possible, 24 hours a day.  It involves equipment such as wheelchairs, walking aids, standers, alternative seating, orthotics and night time positioning equipment, it is helped by active therapy and encouraging movement and it is directed by measurement of body symmetry.  Most importantly Postural Care involves individuals, their families and personal assistants working alongside health and social care practitioners to coproduce effective, person centred solutions to often complex challenges.

We would like to communicate and share our information with others to make aware that with the right equipment, techniques and effective therapeutic night-time positioning, body shape distortion can be managed or even prevented. Support for this event would demonstrate your commitment to ensure you are commissioning sufficient and sufficiently expert preventative postural care services.

We would like to hope that in 25 years into the future we will live in a world in which hip dislocation in young children is seen as the glaring exception and not an accepted norm, a world in which young people rarely undergo radical spinal surgery because they just don’t need to, a world in which people can get on and live their lives with minimal chronic pain and discomfort.  So if your initial reaction to this vision was scepticism this is an opportunity to reflect, a chance to reconsider what might be possible.

The extract above was written by Sarah Clayton and if you want to read the full version please see this link

If you are interested and would like to come along then please let me know and we can get the information out to you.

Please share this as widely as possible!

Thank you

Kaddy Thomas.

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